Pedal and fight against cancer: Kissimmee resident biking in 5th Great Cycle Challenge

James Simmons is prepared to participate in his fifth Great Cycle Challenge in June to raise money for cancer research.

Kissimmee resident James Simmons started riding his first year the Great Cycle Challenge USA to support Armani Cintron.

The son of one of his good friends who was diagnosed with cancer. Unfortunately, Armani passed away before the second year, yet Simmons still continued to ride the fight in his memory.

The Great Cycle Challenge started in 2015, and after just 4 years, the event has grown to become one of the biggest cycling events in the United States.

People of all ages, abilities and from every state across the country, set themselves a personal riding goal and challenge themselves to pedal throughout June to fight kids’ cancer.

In four years, the community of riders from all 50 states have ridden a total of 12,205,253 miles, and together they have raised $16,070,740 in support of research to develop better treatments and find a cure for childhood cancer.

According to Children’s Cancer Research Fund, 15,700 American children are diagnosed with cancer every year, and sadly, 38 children die every week.

“We’re riding to give these kids the brighter futures they deserve, and we believe that any one individual can make their personal impact to fight cancer and save little lives,” according to the Children’s Cancer Research Fund. “Our vision is a world without cancer where all kids are living life, not fighting for it.”

In June, it will be the fifth year in which Simmons will be taking part of the Great Cycle Challenge.

“I have raised over $10,000 and biked almost 5,000 miles,” said James Simmons, “This year I will try to bike 1,500 miles and raise at least $2,500 in the month of June.  I’m starting the fundraising earlier than usual in hopes to generate more donations.”

To donate, go to www.greatcyclechallenge.com and find James Simmons and other participants which are all pedaling towards the same goal. To a future in which children will not die from cancer.